The Tinii

It's plural for Tinius, because we said so.


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Some Darien love and our first little storm – By:Allison

After we left Sunbury Crab Company, we headed for an anchorage at Blackbeard Wildlife Refuge. We had heard good things about this stop and it would be a quick, easy day to get there.

When we arrived there were already several boats anchored. The current was really strong and the winds were blowing. We don’t really have anchoring down to an art, so we were anxious. We motored past all the boats to a good spot. I was driving, and Josh was manning the anchor because we don’t have an electric windlass.

We tried three or four times and the anchor wouldn’t bite. We switched roles and Josh motored way closer to shore which made me nervous so naturally we got over our stress and acted in total kindness toward one another. Ha! Actually we called each other names and yelled a bit. I begrudgingly dropped the anchor anyway and of course when he hit reverse it held.

I proceeded to complain about our location quite a bit. We were both a bit stressed and the anchorage wasn’t as cool as our last one.

We decided to check the weather since it was windy, and it didn’t look promising which added to our happy moods.

The next several days looked stormy and windy. The anchorage wasn’t super protected either.

We decided to skip exploring the island the next day and head out in the morning. It sort of bummed me out so now we were super awesome and kind and loving.

We went to bed with the boat swinging all around. Luckily we slept pretty well regardless after much apologizig to each other over our bad moods and cold words.

The next morning the other boats left around nine and we weren’t far behind. We had decided to go to the town of Darien. It’s about 7 miles off the ICW but they have free docks and that sounded good to us.

We made good time and pulled into Darien just after lunch. The docks were easy to use even though the current was nutso. After docking, we cleaned up and got checked in. Darien reminded me a little bit of my hometown of Headland. It definitely had that small town vibe! There were also about a gazillion historical markers so I was in heaven.

Waterfront Park in Darien, Ga

Waterfront Park in Darien, Ga

Willy on the docks in Darien

Willy on the docks in Darien

I love historical markers so much!

I love historical markers so much!

We walked to a super ghetto laundry mat and got that out of the way. Then we cleaned up and got dinner at a place called Skipper’s Fish Camp that was on the water downtown. It was delicious!!!! The blackened shrimp was pretty much heaven.

We called it a night pretty early after walking around the town and the docks a bit.

Dinner in Darien.

Dinner in Darien.

The next morning we grabbed breakfast at a little cafe called The Purple Pickle. The owner was the nicest and introduced us to the dockmaster and his wife who were super awesome. They let us know that the wine bar would give us a complimentary drink! Free anything makes me happy bit free docks AND wine was just too much.

Later, we took the longboards about a mile down the road to Fort King George historic site. The rangers were really mesmerized by the fact that we longboarded there. It made me feel sort of bad ass but if they had seen me going all of a quarter mile an hour while simultaneously freaking out the entire mile my cover would have been blown.

Tabby ruins in downtown Darien

Tabby ruins in downtown Darien

Fort King George

Fort King George

In the museum.

In the museum.

The fort is just a remodel of what it would have looked like back in the day, but I can be nerdy about history so I enjoyed it. We sat through the cheesy film and everything. Did you know that Darien, Ga was settled by Scottish Highlanders? I didn’t until the cheesy film told me so.

Scottish Highlander house

Scottish Highlander house

Cemetery at Fort King George.

Cemetery at Fort King George.

On the way back to the boat we bought some fresh shrimp for dinner. There was going to be live music at the park we were docked at, so we wanted to eat on the boat.

After cleaning up, we walked to the wine bar for our free drinks. This place was adorable! After the wine, we both got a beer and listened to their live music. There was a gentlemen at the bar with a Bama cap on and I was really trying to refrain from yelling Roll Tide across the bar. I mean, it wasn’t a sports bar it was a fancy wine bar. After the wine though, it was getting harder to control myself so I walked over to finally get it out of my system. We basically became immediate best friends. He was a council member and he gave me his card along with permissible to stay in Darien as long as I wanted.

FREE wine at the wine bar.

FREE wine at the wine bar.

After he gave us a history lesson. On Darien, we decided to go make dinner and listen to the band downton.

It was such a picteuresque night.   The past two weeks have involved less and less engine work and more seafood and wine. I am a fan. Although I don’t mind knowing my way around an engine, I’d rather learn it later. Like when I am not dependent on the engine daily and when its not located I’m the middle of my living space.

I really didn’t want to leave Darien. It was too easy and too free. But we did move on. We want to do more offshore but the weather isn’t cooperating.

We headed down the ICW to the Ferederica River. It wasn’t super far, but we had to time it all right with currents and tides which is a huge pain in the ass. There was a narrow and shallow cut we had to get through. I read horror stories about how bad it was. Deemed “the single worst stretch of the icw” Little Mud River was giving me a headache already. It’s these twisty, scary, shallow stretches that make people go offshore and swear that Georgia is a place to be avoided. To add to my nerves the weather was predicted to be stormy and there was a patch of storms headed our way.

Honestly, Little Mud River was no big deal. Like…not at all. Once you get the hang of how rivers shoal in the currents it makes it easier to find deep water if things get shallow and don’t match up with the charts. Also, I read somewhere to think.of yourself like a barge and don’t take close turns. That helped too.

Right as we were coming out of Little Mud River, the sky got really dark and we could see the rain coming. There wasn’t a good place to anchor so we decided to press on.

We shut all the hatches and put on our rain gear. I stayed inside making sure things stayed dry and that we were on course since we use our laptop.

The lightning popped close enough to make Josh nervous but we crossed paths with a fee other boats who were pushing through so we knew we weren’t crazy.

Braving the storm

Braving the storm

Luckily, it was a short lived storm and we came out on the other side fairly quickly and pretty close to the Frederica River. It was also nice because it cooled everything off!

We motored on down the river to Fort Frederica. Honestly, its a little underwhelming from the water. Tomorrow we might go to shore if we ha e time and do some exploring…we’ll have to see!


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We have the best friends – By:Allison

So, as most of you know in August we will be moving to Haiti to work with New Hope Haiti Mission for the school year. We are going to be working with a family called the Salvants in Port Au Prince.

We haven’t even left yet and our amazing friends are already behind us and New Hope Haiti Mission 110%. We met the girls from Oh So Pretty through our church, The Eden Gate, in Nashville. They’re blog is pretty amazing … I bet you’ve seen their projects or hair do ideas on Pinterst a few times. Anyway, these girls have moved into our house (which we have endearingly named Joyce Lane Farms ever since we got chickens) while we are away. It took a huge weight off our shoulders when we knew these awesome friends would be living in our house, along with our other equally amazing friend, Grace. They could have stopped there, but no. These friends dig through mail to find important stuff, they send us chicken updates, and love on our elderly neighbors for us. Plus, they are doing a fundraiser on their blog for New Hope Haiti Mission! Top notch friends, I tell you.

Running an orphanage in Haiti is no inexpensive task. Check out their fundraiser and if you feel led, consider helping out!

OH SO PRETTY the DIARIES: fundraiser AND A GIVEAWAY WITH RAZOO
http://www.ohsoprettythediaries.com/2013/06/fundraiser-and-giveaway-with-razoo.html?m=1


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Willy’s Ocean Run – BY:Allison

Last time we posted, we were docked next to a dead guy.

Finally, things are working out and the last few days are what we thought this summer would be like all along. We’ve had a few more bumps in the road, but nothing like stewing in corpse fumes on a boat with a broken engine.

We finally left Turner Creek. We ended up being there a week. First, we had alternator issues that my Dad helped us resolve. We woke up ready to leave, and the boat would crank up and then die as soon as Josh let off the key. We checked EVERY electrical component we thought it could be, and nothing made a difference. Finally, we dismantled the carburetor and cleaned it out some even though it didn’t look THAT gunky to my super professional eye.

Anyway, we put it back together and it worked so I’m not going to question it.

We had decided to run offshore for a change. The ICW is a narrow waterway that connects sounds and rivers so that you never have to see the ocean. That is not what sailboats were made for, right? Josh was excited, I was nervous.

We made it out of the Wilmington River and into Wassaw Sound. I had read a million blogs and reviews about this sound…all of which said “get local knowledge” because there are shifting sand bars. The guy who ran our marina said, “It’s pretty straightforward.” We went for it.

As we left the sound, the waves (which were forecasted for 3-4 feet) were about 6 feet and rolling. We bounced around and I was beside myself with nerves. I devoted myself to looking for buoys through the binoculars for a distraction. Luckily, it was a pretty straightforward route to the sea and once we got out of the sound the seas evened out a bit.

Right when I started feeling really good, Josh started feeling really bad.

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Those rolling seas got to him and he proceeded to puke up all his breakfast.

Once he got that over with, he felt better and we hoisted the sails and turned south.

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We ended up making really great time and I did enjoy getting to actually sail in the ocean. It was sort of surreal.

We made it to St.Catherine’s Sound and sailed our way inside. We were almost to the anchorage in Walburg Creek and started letting the sails down and getting things ready to crank up the engine…guess what?

The engine gave us problems.

Basically the choke had to be pulled all the way out for it to run and the choke wire is messed up and you can’t pull it from the cockpit.

So, Josh had to get down there and keep it pulled out while simultaneously watching the laptop screen and navigating me through the creek to our anchorage.

We made it though and parked the boat in the most gorgeous setting we’ve seen yet.

Excuse the crazy hair.

Excuse the crazy hair.

On one side of us is an undeveloped island and the other side is a gorgeous marsh. A lot of people don’t like the stretch in Georgia, but it really is beautiful to us. There were dolphins EVERYWHERE. They’d swim right next to the boat.

I don’t care who you are – seeing a dolphin never gets old. It’s exciting every time. If you disagree, well then we’d never be friends and you should probably not read our blog.

We were planning on getting up the next morning and trekking onward, but slept a little late and really needed to resolve our engine issues.

We started what is becoming all too familiar and broke out the tools to fix the Atomic 4. We knew it wasn’t getting enough fuel so we took apart the carb AGAIN thinking that maybe something didn’t get sealed up well and there was an air leak. In the meantime, Josh tried sucking gas up the fuel line and realized something was blocking it. So, he just blew through it instead, we put it all back together, and it wall ran fine. I think our fuel tank which was running low on fuel got tossed around in the seas. Who knows what sort of crud needs to be cleaned out of there since we haven’t installed the fuel filter that is sitting on the boat. Alas, we’re not going to worry about it too much.

We read in the Skipper Bob guide that you can take your dinghy down the creek to the beach on the point of the island and do some exploring through a “tree graveyard”. So, out came the dinghy. We packed up a picnic and headed over. The beach is pretty desolate and really beautiful. There are these old dead trees everywhere.

DCIM101GOPRO

DCIM101GOPRO

DCIM101GOPRO

DCIM101GOPRO

The trees were worn down like this from the tides.

While exploring we noticed all sorts of weird animal tracks on the beach – more on that later.

I was feeling really good about finally getting to do some relaxing on a beach. Josh even got to swim about 20 feet from these dolphins who were playing in the water.

Yet again, we’d planned on making a big run down the coast. We were going to have to wake up early and make it to Brunswick, Ga for gas. We knew we were getting low. This seemed like a stressful idea, so we made another plan.

There was a little restaurant/ marina called Sunbury Crab Company about 6 miles off the ICW in St.Catherine’s Sound. We decided we’d head there instead.

So, we got up and made the not so grueling trek to the marina where we are currently docked. This place is the bees knees.

 It’s a family run place. The owners live next door to the the restaurant and let us use their pool! We splurged and got dinner here. Apparently this place was in Coastal Living Magazine recently as one of the top 22 Seafood Dives and I can see why. First of all, they have “cocktail hour” for boaters which translated to free wine or beer. We also got a bucket of crabs and a lesson on how to eat them properly. The food was amazing! This place has that comfortable atmosphere that Josh and I love.  A lot of the marinas on the way seem rather stuffy. This definitely wasn’t like that at all.

Eating crabs at Sunbury Crab Company.

sunbury2

This place is the best! Sunbury lit up at night.

Also, the owner here told us a little bit more about St.Catherine’s Island that we had explored. It turns out that the island has a really cool history and there is a plantation on there that used to be owned by Button Gwinnett who was an original signer to the Declaration of Independence. Now, the island is run by New York Zoological Society and is used for research…aka there are tons of crazy animals on the island. Apparently they raise endangered mammals there which explains the crazy animal tracks on the beach. However, we totally didn’t explore as much as we would have had we known we could stumble upon gazelles or lemurs. There’s also some really cool history involving Spanish missions that used to be on the island.

There are some other boaters here who told us not to pass up Blackbeard Wildlife Refuge on Sapelo Sound. I had originally wanted to go there anyway, so we’re going to head there tomorrow sometime.

We’re feeling super happy now that our bellies are full of fresh crab and we’ve had a few days of good sailing and nice anchorages. Hopefully things keep going well, because we’ve only got eight and a half weeks before we head off to Haiti!


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I like to walk- Josh

The past few days have been pretty frustrating and exhausting.  I guess I can’t complain too much though.  I mean we ARE living on a sailboat, sleeping whenever we feel like it, and don’t have to deal with the pressures of having a job.  It’s only fair that we have to deal with working on engines sometimes.

After we replaced the voltage regulator on the alternator we cranked the engine and it started right up.  The next morning we were planning on leaving and the engine would rev up like it was about to start and then die as soon as I would let go of the key.  My first thought was that it was probably electrical.  We had been having other problems with the ignition switch anyways and I thought that maybe it had just finally kicked it.  Allison and  I decided to take the bus to West Marine to get the stuff to replace the ignition switch and wiring.  We took the bus and didn’t get back for six hours.  I guess one or more of them had broken down.  By 10pm we had finished installing the new ignition switch and realized that it fixed the problem that we were having with it before, but it still wouldn’t start.

The next day I hotwired it thinking that bypassing some of the other connections might help.  It didn’t.  In fact, somewhere in the process of trying to get it started I burned up the condenser.  So I decided to take the bus to the auto parts store to get a new condenser.

I waited at the bus stop for an hour and a half.  It never came.  So, I walked/ jogged (in flip flops) the  9 mile round trip to Napa.  When I got there the guy looked through tons of parts for about 15 minutes and finally told me that he didn’t have one.  The door was in the process of closing behind me when I hear the guy yell “Hold on bud”.  He walks to the back again and comes out with the 8 dollar part that I needed.

After replacing that  I still had the issue of the boat starting and dying as soon as I take my hand off the key.  Turns out that it was not an electrical issue at all.  The next day I took the carburetor apart and cleaned it really well.  It was a little gummed up.  After I did that it started up right away. We really should install that fuel filter….

We plan on taking off tomorrow and going offshore outside the inner coastal waterway for a bit.  It sounds a lot more pleasant than trying to go through Hell’s Gate.

Also it is a “Supermoon” right now so the tides are crazy.

It has been going from this...

It has been going from this…

To this!!!

To this!!!


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More about the dead guy- By Josh

Well.. Yesterday was interesting (if your confused read the previous post).  People keep asking me if I was able to find anything out about the dead guy.  Here is what I know…

This is his boat.

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It looks like a boat you would find a dead body on.

Apparently he was taking it down the coast much like us… Yes on THAT boat…

He stopped here several weeks ago to do some repairs on his boat. (From the looks of it it would have taken him the rest of his life to fix it up even if he lived another 20 years).

The owner of the marina said that he was an older man who he thought was an alcoholic.  Apparently the owner thought that the guy was just trying to avoid paying his slip fee.  So yesterday he went to try and get the guy to pay up (as he had been doing everyday for a week).  When the guy didn’t answer he started yelling to the guy that he knows he is in there and if he doesn’t come out he is coming in. When he opened the hatch it was obvious what was going on.

Today the smell is completely gone.  Apparently the owner took 12 boxes of moth balls and 5 gallons kitty litter and put them all over the inside of the boat. Then he duck taped all the hatches, windows, and vents shut so none of the death fumes could escape.

Also in case you were wondering… No we are not going to steal that awesome anchor on the back of the boat… Maybe if we had a better place to keep it.


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“Sorry it smells like rotting fish” – By:Allison

We’re still in Turner Creek just south of Savannah. We anchored here for three days. There’s a Publix nearby and public transportation into Savannah, so we thought it’d be a good place to do some shopping and site seeing. The second night here, some friends from Nashville were in town so Willy had it’s first guests! They brought some steaks to throw on the grill and we had a good time trying to convice Luke he should also buy a boat 🙂

The next day we were all ready to head out, but our battery was low. It had been draining a little faster than usual which was odd. It took us awhile to get the boat cranked up, but we finally did. We didn’t get too far though. The engine quit on us and wouldn’t restart because of the battery problem. We probably could have gotten jumped and kept going, but we were in a good spot for fixing a boat and the marina nearby had a spot open so we got a tow there.

The marina is run by really nice people. It’s a little worn down and not in the best shape, but it’s not expensive and there are lots of places within walking distance. There is a little shack on the water that seems like it is from The Rescuers. Remember that movie? With the mice and the dragonfly named Evinrude? Old blues music drifts down the docks from this shack and it only adds to it’s sort of class-less charm. We docked up here and called our dads…like you do. My dad thought there was a bad connection somewhere so we started checking them. Luckily, my parents needed to come up here anyway to get the jeep from my cousin’s house in Beaufort (who we stayed with while we were there). So, my parents offerend to help us out while they came to get the jeep.

In the meantime we thought we’d take the alternator in to be tested, but we wanted it to go to a real alternator shop. So I looked one up and we found the bus route to Mr.Alternator and Starter. Josh threw the alternator in a backpack and away we went. Once we got there I thought we’d struck gold. The best shops are the sketchiest looking, right? Two dogs there to greet you, random old men hanging out and chatting, in the rougher part of town.

Josh hauled out the alternator and said he wanted to have it checked out. The guy grabbed it, and immediately got on the phone. I was chatting up the older man who was clearly just hanging out. The main guy got off the phone and croaked out, “Five hundred bucks.” We were thouroughly confused. “This has a lot of hours on it. It needs rebuilding – and what are these wires anyway.” Stuttering from confusion we admitted we weren’t sure what those wires went to. I mean, we just disconnected the thing and there are about 5 million random wires on our boat. He then proceeded to chastise us for not knowing our boat well enough. At one point, his friend who I had been chatting with said, “Why don’t you hook it up and test those wires. See what’s happening.” “I don’t need to,” was his reply. “It’s shot. I know that much. But you’ll definitely want me to rebuild it.”

We should have walked out, but we really just wanted him to get in there and SEE if anything was wrong so we paid him a fee to open it up and see what was wrong. Not before some more chastising, however, and a lecture on how he could, “rebuild an alternator 50 miles offshore if he had to.”

The more we thought about it, the more we wished we had not left the alternator with him. We wanted to explore Savannah some though, so we took the bus back to downtown and tried to brush it off. Unfortunately, Mr.Alternator wasn’t going to let us. He ended up calling us each at least five times. Once, he informed Josh we should get rid of our boat because we don’t know what we’re doing. Keep in mind this is the alternator mechanic who can’t identify the wires on our alternator.

We make a plan to just go there the next morning and retrieve the part. So, we load up again on the bus and head over. Luckily, Mr.Alternator wasn’t there but a much kinder man was behind the counter. He told us that the voltage regulator had been bypassed and that it would cost about $300 to rebuild the alternator. We kindly told him we just wanted it back.

So now we have the questionable alternator in tow and we  meet up with my parents in Savannah who had just arrived. We ended up riding with them to Beaufort to pick up the jeep and see my cousin. We got some dinner and my parents got a little mini tour of the town. If you’ve never been and you are going to be in the Lowcountry, you have to visit Beaufort. It’s such a pleasant place! There is a lot of history, it’s very walkable, and there are a ton of cool shops and restaurants (including my cousin’s store The Beaufort Clothing Co.)

But, as usual, I digress.

So, back at the boat my Dad comes up with a rewiring scheme and figures out what’s wrong in about five minutes. We make a plan to take the alternator to a new shop in the morning for a new volage regulator. We also realize we need a new battery switch because there’s a short in the one we have.

The next day, today, is when the real story begins.

When my parents first got to the marina, I apologized for the smell. Every now and then you got a waft of what smelled like rotten-ness. I assumed people were cleaning fish or catching crabs and the leftovers were smelling rather putrid. It wasn’t overwhelming, but certainly unpleasant every now and then.

This morning, while sitting around patting ourselves on the back for a new and improved battery system on the boat, we see an ambulance pull up. I had just walked by some people at the previously described shack and they seemed to be in okay moods so I didn’t think much about the ambulance. My back was to the situation as well. My parents and Josh were keeping a close eye on the situation. A few minutes later, police cars arrive and the marina owner starts leading the EMT’s down the docks to a derelict boat on the other docks directly in front of us. They proceed to open up the companionway and the putrid smell I had assumed to be rotting sea creatures became overpowering. “Do you think someone died in there?” Josh asked.

Our noses said, “Definitely.”

We proceed to watch one EMT lower himself into the boat and come up rather pale. “Do you want to go see,” he asks his coworker. That answer was, is, and should forever be NO.

At this point, I am realizing that I have been smelling a dead body for THREE days. Three. Adventure of a lifetime, folks. And here you thought living on a sailboat was the glamorous life. Truth is, I am currently docked directly downwind from a rotting corpse.

Yes, it is very sad that this man died and no one even missed him or realized it for four days (he passed away before we arrived at this marina). I felt especially bad for the marina owner who made the discovery and was clearly shaken by the situation.

I also, could not stop wishing I had brought my Netti-pot to thoroughly disinfect my nostrils. The desire to shower in some strong anti-bacterial soap is also quite overwhelming. Everyone got a bit of a chuckle over the fact that I apologized for the smell which was unknowingly a dead man.

Josh and I are currently sitting at a library writing this blog. The man’s body has been removed, but the stench is lingering. Knowing what it is now, we couldn’t keep marinating in the fumes. We felt very determined not to spend money eating out, but tonight might be the exception. Grilled sausages were on the menu, but I just don’t think I can cook and eat with the smell of death all around us.

We haven’t gotten the full story on this man, or what happened. We aren’t sure if that was his boat, if the marina staff knew him, or exactly how he died. I don’t know if we will, because hopefully we are high tailing it out of here tomorrow. The plan is to head to  another marina near a stretch of the ICW called Hell’s Gate. We’ll rest up a bit and prepare to conquer, yes conquer, Hell’s Gate on a rising tide. After that, we’ll keep making our way south toward St.Augustine. Hopefully, there are no more dead bodies along the way.


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Day 3 – By: Allison

Yesterday, we didn’t go too far and stopped at a marina. All the adrenaline of the first day combined with very little sleep on our first night anchoring had us feeling super crappy and pretty worn out. We just needed a day to celebrate all our firsts and relax. So we pulled in for fuel and when the dock master at Hilton Head Harbor Marina said something about a pool we caved.
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After a relaxing day, we got back up and going around nine. We left Hilton Head behind and entered Calibogue Sound. I got to see a stingray jump out of the water which pretty much made my day.

After the open sound, we had to navigate some narrow and shallow cuts. I had just downloaded a new FREE open source navigational software called openCPN. I like it so much better than SeaClear (what we were using). It’s much easier to use. In case you are wondering..a lot of people pay big bucks for a chartplotter system on the boat to keep them on track in the Intracoastal Waterway (or ICW, or The Ditch). We bought a $50 gps that plugs into a laptop and downloaded NOAA charts for free, then use a free software program for a chartplotter. It’s awesome.

Anyway if any other cheap ass sailing people are reading this, use OpenCPN instead of SeaClear.

So we successfully navigated Fields Cut, and a few other tight spots with this set up. In the sun its hard for Josh to see the screen so we tag team it and all those years working together came I’m handy.

We made it to an anchorage in Turner Creek and are here now. We are just watching the sunset and about to make tuna burgers on the grill.

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We might stay a few days and take a bus into Savannah. Once we move on, we’re gonna go to a really inexpensive marina not too far away. I saw the price on Active Captain…then I saw that they have golf carts you can take into town. Uh, yes please!

Now that you know all the nitty gritty details of our day, I am going to get a little emotional on ya’ll.

To all the friends and family who told us not to quit and who encouraged us…thank you. Seriously….if you have a dream that seems ridiculous, or scary, and it’s really hard to see it through…surround yourself with people who won’t let you quit.

People who tell you (in slightly fouler words) to buck up and sail the crap out of your $4000 sailboat.

People who call you and help you problem solve every step of the way.

People who pray for you, and give you homemade limoncello, and cards stuffed with cash for the hard days.

Read blogs of people who have done what you are interested in.

If you’re a fellow Christian, find a church full of people telling you to get off your ass and do what you’re made to!

It was really hard to quit a job I loved, pack up a home I loved, and leave neighbors I loved. You know what though? Josh and I wanted to live on a boat. We wanted to go back to Haiti (less than 10 weeks until that happens). We wanted to live overseas. God turned those wants into something more and we couldn’t be happier that (to quote my favorite movie) “It’s all happening.”

God has literally provided every step of the way.  At the boatyard we were at, a new friend even gave us sailing gloves which we ended up needed really badly.

Things will work out. It won’t be easy…not at all. It will, however, be worth it. Be wise, have some common sense and faith and do what you know you are supposed to do.